Seven Seas Licenses ‘Re:Monster,’ Cops Bust File-Sharers

remonsterSeven Seas has announced another new license: Haruyoshi Kobayakawa’s Re:Monster, about a teen who dies and is reborn as a goblin in a swords-and-sorcery fantasy world. The first volume will be out in November. [Anime News Network]

The Japanese National Police Agency has arrested 44 people on charges of illegally uploading and sharing files; among them are five men accused of uploading volumes of Attack on Titan, Bleach, and other manga via Share. [Anime News Network]

Viz and Seven Seas go 60/40 on the New York Times manga best-seller list, with six Viz titles and four from Seven Seas. The top seller is vol. 5 of Tokyo Ghoul, with vol. 8 of Monster Musume coming in second. [New York Times]

ICv2 lists the top ten manga properties for the fall of 2015; it’s a mix of old and new series, with Attack on Titan topping the list. [ICv2]

Lauren Orsini decides not to go on a doujinshi shopping spree in Japan, given the legal problems that she might run into bringing erotic manga back to the States. [Forbes]

Tomoko Ninomiya is returning to Nodame Cantabile, more than five years after the original series ended, with a one-shot chapter in Kiss that looks at Noda as she is about to turn 30. [RocketNews24]

OrangeIchigo Takano is working on a spinoff of her manga Orange, which will run in Futabasha’s Monthly Action magazine. Seven Seas is publishing the original series in English. [Anime News Network]

The Naoki Urasawa show at the Setagaya Literary Museum in Tokyo features over 1,000 original drawings, including four chapters of 20th Century Boys and the entire final volume of Monster—which brought back some unfortunate memories: “When I was working on the final stage of this manga, the membrane of my eyes and nose became swollen, and I was a total mess,” Urasawa said. “Looking at those pages still reminds me of my obsession at the time and almost makes me sick.” [The Japan Times]

The Manga Bookshelf team looks over this week’s sparse array of new releases. [Manga Bookshelf]

Erica Friedman collects all the yuri news in one place for us with the latest edition of Yuri Network News. [Okazu]


Ash Brown on vol. 8 of After School Nightmare (Experiments in Manga)
Mark Thomas on vol. 4 of Appleseed (The Fandom Post)
Kanta Ishida on Blue Giant (The Japan Times)
Katherine J. Parker on vols. 3 and 4 of Btooom! (The Fandom Post)
Johanna Draper Carlson on vol. 1 of Fuku Fuku: Kitten Tales (Comics Worth Reading)
Sean Gaffney on vol. 2 of JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure: Battle Tendency (A Case Suitable for Treatment)
Leroy Douresseaux on vol. 20 of Kamisama Kiss (The Comic Book Bin)
Johanna Draper Carlson on vol. 3 of Kiss Him, Not Me! (Comics Worth Reading)
Lesley Aeschliman on vol. 16 of Magi (WatchPlayRead)
Johanna Draper Carlson on vol. 3 of Master Keaton (Comics Worth Reading)
Sakura Eries on vol. 5 of Master Keaton (Comic Attack)
Kristin on vol. 1 of Monthly Girls’ Nozaki-kun (Comic Attack)
Sean Gaffney on vol. 2 of Monthly Girls’ Nozaki-kun (A Case Suitable for Treatment)
Johanna Draper Carlson on vols. 5 and 6 of My Neighbor Seki (Comics Worth Reading)
Anna N on vol. 2 of QQ Sweeper (Manga Report)
Helen on vols. 2 and 3 of ReLIFE (The OASG)
Richard Gutierrez on vol. 3 of Twin Star Exorcists (The Fandom Post)
Matthew Warner on vol. 2 of Yo-kai Watch (The Fandom Post)

The Manga Revue: Handa-Kun

VIZ isn’t the only manga publisher experimenting with digital-first releases; Yen Press has also rolled out new titles in digital form before introducing print editions. One of the latest Yen titles to make the leap from web to page is Handa-kun, Satsuki Yoshino’s comedy about a talented teen calligrapher. If the premise sounds familiar, that’s because the title character also stars in Yoshino’s later series Barakamon–which begs the question, is Handa-kun just for fans, or will it appeal to the uninitiated? Read on for my verdict.

handakunHanda-kun, Vol. 1
By Satsuki Yoshino
Rated T, for teens
Yen Press, $15.00

By the time we meet Sei Handa in the first pages of Barakamon, he’s a twenty-something jerk who bristles at criticism, resents authority, and resists overtures of friendship. The tenth-grader we meet in Handa-kun isn’t as curmudgeonly, but he has a problem: he constantly misreads other people’s motives, whether he’s interpreting a love letter as a threat or perceiving a job offer as a “shady” attempt to unload stolen clothing. For all his weirdness, however, Handa’s classmates worship him, viewing his odd behavior and sharp calligraphy skills as proof of his coolness.

Author Satsuki Yoshino wrings a surprising number of laughs from this simple premise by populating the story with a large, boisterous cast of supporting players. Though the outcome of every chapter is the same–female suitors and male rivals alike profess their sincere admiration for Handa–the path to each character’s epiphany takes unexpected turns. Yoshino complements these humorous soliloquies with expressive, elastic artwork that sells us on the characters’ transformations.

In the volume’s best chapter, for example, Yoshino pits Handa against a bespectacled nerd named Juniichi. Juniichi’s entire self-image is rooted in his years of service as class representative–that is, until one of his peers nominates Handa for the honor. Yoshino makes us feel and smell Juniichi’s desperation by showing us how Juniichi sweats, grimaces, and paces his way through the vote-counting process, flagging or rallying with each ballot. By chapter’s end, Juniichi’s cheerful declaration that “Right now, I feel the best I have ever felt in my life” seems like the natural culmination of this fraught emotional journey–even though, of course, his feeling is rooted in a false sense of Handa’s moral rectitude.

My primary concern about Handa-kun is that the series will overstay its welcome. Handa seems fundamentally unable to learn from his interactions with peers, and his classmates seem just as clueless in their blind adoration of him. If Yoshino doesn’t take steps to change this dynamic–perhaps by introducing a character who is genuinely unimpressed with Handa–the series risks settling into a predictable routine. For a few volumes, however, the current set-up will do just fine, offering the same brand of off-kilter humor as Haven’t You Heard? I’m Sakamoto.

The bottom line: The first volume is funny enough to appeal to newbies and die-hard Barakamon fans.

Reviews: Megan R. jumps in the WABAC machine for a close look at two BL titles from the mid-00s: Brother (originally published by Drama Queen) and Love Pistols (originally published by BLU Manga). At The OASG, Justin Stroman convenes a round table discussion of Kentaro Miura’s Giganto Maxima.

Theron Martin on vol. 1 of Angel Beats!: Heaven’s Door (Anime News Network)
Matt on vol. 1 of Die Wergelder (Ani-TAY)
Matt on vol. 1 of Dimension W (Ani-TAY)
Julie on vol. 1 of FukuFuku: Kitten Tales (Manga Maniac Cafe)
Helen on vol. 1 of Ga-Rei (The OASG)
Sarah on vols. 2-3 of Kiss Him, Not Me! (Anime UK News)
Sheena McNeil on vol. 8 of Kiss of the Rose Princess (Sequential Tart)
Karen Maeda on vol. 3 of Komomo Confiserie (Sequential Tart)
Terry Hong on vol. 5 of Master Keaton (Book Dragon)
Ken H. on vol. 7 of Noragami (Sequential Ink)
SKJAM! on vols. 10-11 of Ooku: The Inner Chambers (SKJAM! Reviews)
Plutoburns on Parasistence Sana (Plutoburns)*
Marissa Lieberman on vol. 1 of School-Live! (No Flying No Tights)
Matt on vol. 2 of School-Live! (Ani-TAY)
Kane Bugeja on vol. 7 of Seraph of the End (Snap 30)
Sarah on vol. 4 of Servamp (Anime UK News)
Rebecca Silverman on vol. 1 of Taboo Tattoo (Anime News Network)
Nic Creamer on vol. 3 of UQ Holder! (Anime News Network)
Michael Burns on vols. 5-6 of Yamada-kun and the Seven Witches (Ani-TAY)

* Denotes a video review

New Licenses: Blame, Sherlock Holmes, Bloom Into You

sherlockmangaTitan Comics is bringing the Sherlock Holmes manga A Study in Pink to English-language readers. [Comics Worth Reading]

Vertical announced three new manga licenses at its Katsucon panel on Friday: Tsutomu Nihei’s Blame (which was published by Tokyopop back in the 2000s); Yōkai Kyōshitsu (Dissolving Classroom), by the horror master Junji Ito (Gyo, Uzumaki); and Ryō Yasohachi’s Shinazu no Ryōken (Immortal Hounds). Vertical is currently publishing Nihei’s Knights of Sidonia. [Anime News Network]

Seven Seas has licensed the yuri series Bloom Into You. [Anime News Network]

Fuku Fuku Kitten TalesThe Manga Bookshelf team discuss this week’s new releases, a bumper crop that includes new volumes of Air Gear, Inuyashiki, and Blood Lad, plus the debut of Fuku Fuku Kitten Tales. [Manga Bookshelf]

The Japanese serialization of Assassination Classroom will end in the 16th issue of Weekly Shonen Jump, due out in March. [Anime News Network]

Bkub Okawa trolls his readers. I’m not gonna spoil it—just go read! [Crunchyroll]

Erica Friedman rounds up the latest yuri news. [Okazu]

Reviews: The Manga Bookshelf team files a romantic set of Bookshelf Briefs. Ash Brown posts some short takes at Experiments in Manga.

Lesley Aeschliman on vol. 8 of Assassination Classroom (WatchPlayRead)
Sean Gaffney on vol. 1 of Behind the Scenes!! (A Case Suitable for Treatment)
Kristin on vol. 1 of Behind the Scenes (Comic Attack)
Anna N on vol. 1 of Behind the Scenes!! (Manga Report)
DJ Horn on vol. 2 of Black Bullet (The Fandom Post)
A Library Girl on vols. 1-3, (omnibus edition) 4, and 5 of Blood Alone (A Library Girl’s Familiar Diversions)
Kory Cerjak on vol. 9 of Deadman Wonderland (The Fandom Post)
Sean Gaffney on vol. 1 of Fate/Zero (A Case Suitable for Treatment)
Sean Gaffney on vols. 1 and 2 of Franken Fran (A Case Suitable for Treatment)
Helen on vol. 1 of Ga-Rei (The OASG)
Manjiorin on Giganto Maxia (The OASG)
Sean Gaffney on vol. 27 of Hayate the Combat Butler (A Case Suitable for Treatment)
A Library Girl on vols. 1 and 2 of His Favorite (A Library Girl’s Familiar Diversions)
Rebecca Silverman on vol. 2 of Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure, Part 2: Battle Tendency (Anime News Network)
A Library Girl on vol. 3 of Mixed Vegetables (A Library Girl’s Familiar Diversions)
Lesley Aeschliman on vol. 3 of My Hero Academia (WatchPlayRead)
Ken H. on vol. 7 of Noragami (Sequential Ink)
Sean Gaffney on vol. 77 of One Piece (A Case Suitable for Treatment)
A Library Girl on vol. 2 of One-Punch Man (A Library Girl’s Familiar Diversions)
Ollie Barder on The Osamu Tezuka Story (Forbes)
Ash Brown on vol. 1 of Planetes (Experiments in Manga)
Scott Cederlund on vol. 1 of Planetes (Panel Patter)
Matthew Warnter on vol. 2 of Puella Magi Suzune Magica (The Fandom Post)
Ash Brown on vol. 3 of Requiem of the Rose King (Experiments in Manga)
Helen on vol. 1 of Samurai Drive (The OASG)
Sean Gaffney on vol. 1 of School Judgment: Gakkyu Hotei (A Case Suitable for Treatment)
Lori Henderson on vol. 1 of School Judgment: Gakkyu Hotei (Manga Xanadu)
Rebecca Silverman on vol. 1 of Taboo Tattoo (Anime News Network)

The Manga Revue: Behind the Scenes!!

It’s a snowy day here in Boston, giving me the perfect excuse to tunnel under a blanket and read a goofy, light-hearted story. My escapism of choice: Bisco Hatori’s latest series, Ouran University Host Club Behind the Scenes!!

BehindTheScenes-01Behind the Scenes!!, Vol. 1
By Bisco Hatori
Rated T, for teens
VIZ Media, $9.99

Behind the Scenes!! embodies what’s good–and not so good–about Bisco Hatori’s storytelling.

In the plus column, Hatori has a knack for writing ensemble pieces in which the principal characters exhibit a genuine fondness for one another. The stars of her latest series are Shichikoku University’s Art Squad, a scrappy outfit that makes props for the Film Club–or, more accurately, clubs, as there are several students groups competing for the Art Squad’s services, each with their own aesthetic objectives. Ranmaru, the series’ protagonist, gets a crash course in film making when he stumbles into the middle of an Art Squad project: a low-budget horror flick. As penance for disrupting the shoot, Ranmaru joins the Art Squad and is quickly pressed into service painting props, folding paper cranes, and building a fake hot spring.

These scenes–in which Ranmaru and the gang tackle set-design challenges–are among the series’ most enjoyable. Not only do they give us a sneak peek at the movie-making process, they also show us how the club members’ friendly overtures embolden the timid, self-doubting Ranmaru to let go of his painful childhood and become part of a community. In one exchange, for example, Ranmaru tells a fellow squad member about a black-and-white film that made a powerful impression on him. Hatori cuts between scenes from this imaginary film and Ranmaru’s face, registering how powerfully Ranmaru identified with the film’s principal character, a toy robot who dreams of flying. The symbolism of the toy is hard to miss, but the directness and simplicity with which Hatori stages the moment leavens the breezy tone with a note of poignancy.

In the minus column, Hatori often strains for comic effect, overwhelming the reader with too many shots of characters mugging, shouting, and flapping their arms. The Art Squad’s interactions with various student directors give Hatori license to indulge this tendency; the auteurs’ snits and whims frequently force the Art Squad members to behave more like the Scooby Doo gang–or Hollywood fixers–than actual college students juggling coursework and extra-curriculars. (The Art Squad even has a goofy dog mascot.)

At the same time, however, these wannabe Spielbergs bring out the best in Hatori’s draftsmanship. Each one’s personality is firmly established in just a single panel: one looks like a refugee from Swingin’ London (or perhaps an Austin Powers film); another dresses like a Taisho-era author, swanning around campus in a yukata; and a third sports a shaggy mane, Buddy Holly glasses, and a female entourage. The efficiency with which Hatori introduces these characters, and the range of personalities they embody, demonstrate just how crisp and distinctive her artwork can be. That Hatori’s heroes are visually bland by comparison says less about her skills, I think, than it does her desire to make Ranmaru’s new “family” seem normal–well, as normal as anyone who specializes in making fake zombie guts can be.

The bottom line: Tentatively recommended. If Hatori can tone down her characters’ antic behavior, Behind the Scenes!! could be a winner.

Reviews: Sean Gaffney and Michelle Smith post a fresh crop of Bookshelf Briefs. Also new at Manga Bookshelf: Sean tackles the first volume of orange (no, that’s not a typo), Anna N. reviews Takeshi Obata’s kiddie-thriller School Judgment, and Ash Brown weighs in on Hiroaki Samura’s stylish (and bloody) manga Die Wergelder. Further afield, translator Jocelyn Allen posts her annual doujinshi round-up.

Sara Dempster on The Angel of Elhamburg (No Flying No Tights)
Matthew Warner on vol. 5 of Ani-Emo (The Fandom Post)
Michael Burns on vols. 7-8 of Barakamon (AniTAY)
Johanna Draper Carlson on vol. 12 of Chi’s Sweet Home (Comics Worth Reading)
Adam Brunell on vol. 12 of Deadman Wonderland (ComicSpectrum)
SKJAM! on Dream Fossil (SKJAM! Reviews)
Josh Begley on vol. 2 of Emma (The Fandom Post)
Patrick Moore on vol. 1 of Honey So Sweet (Bentobyte)
Sean Gaffney on vol. 1 of How to Raise a Boring Girlfriend (A Case Suitable for Treatment)
Ken H. on Junji Ito’s Cat Diary: Yon & Mu (Sequential Ink)
Kory Cerjak on vol. 13 of Magi (The Fandom Post)
Megan R. on Millennium Prime Minister (The Manga Test Drive)
Rebecca Silverman on vol. 12 of My Little Monster (Anime News Network)
Exile on vol. 1 of My Monster Secret (AniTAY)
Jocelyn Allen on Night Worker (Brain vs. Book)
Matthew Warner on vol. 2 of Puella Magi Tart Magica (The Fandom Post)
Matt on vol. 5 of A Silent Voice (AniTAY)
Terry Hong on vol. 2 of Ultraman (Book Dragon)
Nick Creamer on vol. 2 of UQ Holder! (Anime News Network)
Frank Inglese on Uzumaki Naruto: Illustrations (Snap 30)
Sheena McNeil on vol. 3 of Yo-Kai Watch (Sequential Tart)



The Manga Revue: Giganto Maxia

Kentaro Miura’s Berserk is a rite of passage for manga readers: you may not have soldiered past the second volume, but you tried because a Real Manga Fan told you that it was The Most Amazing Manga Ever. I freely admit that I didn’t finish Berserk–too violent for me, I’m afraid–but I marveled at its intricate plotting, feverish pace, and deadly seriousness. (Also: Miura’s penchant for awful names.) When Dark Horse announced that it had acquired Giganto Maxia, I decided to treat this new series as a second “date” with Miura–a chance to decide if I’d judged his work unfairly the first time around. Here’s how that date went.

giganto_maxiaGiganto Maxia
By Kentaro Miura
Rated 16+, for older teens
Dark Horse, $13.99

Let’s start with the good: Giganto Maxia is a visual feast that’s every bit as imaginative as Hayao Mizayaki’s Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind. Kentaro Miura’s pages abound in war-ravaged landscapes, fantastic fighting machines, and bizarre creatures that straddle the fence between human and animal. The specificity of his vision, and the care with which he stages battle scenes, obviates the need for dialogue; we can almost hear and feel what the characters are experiencing on every page.

Miura’s script, however, is as tin-eared and self-serious as a high school literary rag. The two leads–Prome, a pale mystic who looks like a young girl, and Delos, a warrior slave–spend an inordinate amount of time describing what’s happening around them, even when the pictures make it abundantly clear. Yet for all their chatter, neither character provides much useful information about the post-apocalyptic world in which Giganto Maxia takes place: who are the Olympians? Why are they so intent on annihilating other tribes? And what, exactly, are the Giganto? The absence of these details leaves a big hole in the story: the characters’ motivation for fighting the Giganto. At the end of the volume, we’re not really sure what Prome and Delos stand for, or what’s at stake if they fail–two fatal flaws in a series that desperately wants the reader to get swept up in their quest.

The bottom line: A talky script and barely-there characters sink this smart-looking fantasy series.

The publisher provided a review copy.

Reviews: Sean Gaffney and Michelle Smith round up the latest volumes of Arpeggio of Blue Steel, Kimi ni Todoke, and Non Non Biyori at Manga Bookshelf; Sean also reads The Testament of New Sister Devil so that you don’t have to. Over at Women Write About Comics, Amanda Vail and Paige Sammartino offer “short & sweet” reviews of Barakamon, Are You Alice?, and My Hero Academia.

Nick Creamer on vol. 3 of The Ancient Magus’ Bride (Anime News Network)
Gary Thompson on vol. 10 of Black Jack (The Fandom Post)
Demelza on Fairy Tail (Anime UK News)
Megan R. on Gate 7 (The Manga Test Drive)
Nick Creamer on vol. 7 of Genshiken: Second Season (Anime News Network)
Sean Rogers on A Girl on the Shore (The Globe and Mail)
Sheena McNeil on vol. 1 of Honey So Sweet (Sequential Tart)
Rebecca Silverman on vol. 1 of Honey So Sweet (Anime News Network)
Matt on vol. 2 of Inuyashiki (AniTAY)
Sean Gaffney on Kagerou Daze III: The Children Reason (A Case Suitable for Treatment)
Claire Napier on Memoirs of Amorous Gentlemen (Comics Alliance)
Michael Burns on vol. 13 of Nisekoi (AniTAY)
Matthew Warner on vol. 76 of One Piece (The Fandom Post)
Matthew Warner on vol. 3 of One-Punch Man (The Fandom Post)
Rebecca Silverman on vol. 4 of One-Punch Man (Anime News Network)
Matthew Warner on vol. 3 of Peepo Choo (The Fandom Post)
Sheena McNeil on vol. 5 of Pokemon X.Y. (Sequential Tart)
Helen on vol. 1 of ReLife (The OASG)
Matt on vol. 4 of A Silent Voice (AniTAY)
Saeyong Kim on vol. 3 of Thermae Romae (No Flying No Tights)
Sarah on Tsubasa WoRLD CHRoNiCLE: Niraikani (Anime UK News)
Charlotte Finn on Wandering Son (Comics Alliance)



January Releases and Why We Like One-Punch Man

Naruto Seventh HokageWhat’s new in January? I did a quick roundup of this month’s new manga releases, which include the one-shot Naruto: The Seventh Hokage and the Scarlet Spring, as well as new volumes of One-Punch Man, Blue Exorcist, The Demon Prince of Momochi House, and My Neighbor Seki. [Barnes and Noble Sci-Fi/Fantasy Blog]

There’s a bumper crop of new manga out this week, and the Manga Bookshelf team is here to sort them out for you. [Manga Bookshelf]

One Piece creator Eiichiro Oda says the manga he is most jealous of is Your Lie in April, Naoshi Arakawa’s shonen romance about young musicians. Oda pointed out that music is difficult to portray on the page and praised Arakawa’s depiction. “Before a deadline [I got it] as a change of pace, but I ended up reading the whole thing and forgot about my manuscripts. I got the whole studio buying it on the way home,” Oda said. [Anime News Network]

A new Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney manga is in the works, to go with the anime. [Manga Xanadu]

Ollie Barder writes about the appeal of One-Punch Man, which is topping the charts in the U.S. as well as Japan. [Forbes]

Erica Friedman rounds up all the yuri updates, including word of a Takarazuka show coming to New York, in the latest episode of Yuri Network News. [Okazu]

Jocelyne Allen writes about Manga Henshusha, a book of interviews with five manga editors. [Brain Vs. Book]

Here’s an interesting interview with Koré Yamazaki, the creator of The Ancient Magus’ Bride, although it’s in French. [Manganews]

Oh My Goddess creator Kousuke Fujishima has brought Paradise Residence (which will be published in English by Kodansha Comics) to an end and is starting a new series. [Anime News Network]


Lesley Aeschliman on vol. 14 of Blue Exorcist (WatchPlayRead)
Leroy Douresseaux on vol. 3 of The Demon Prince of Momochi House (The Comic Book Bin)
Johanna Draper Carlson on vols. 9 and 10 of Food Wars (Comics Worth Reading)
Gabe Peralta on A Girl on the Shore (The Fandom Post)
Andrew Wheeler on vols. 1-4 of Gou-Dere Sora Nagihara (ComicMix)
Erica Friedman on vol. 6 of Himawari-San (Okazu)
Kristin on vol. 1 of Honey So Sweet (Comic Attack)
Kory Cerjak on vol. 1 of JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure Part 2: Battle Tendency (The Fandom Post)
Kristin on vols. 11-13 of Kamisama Kiss (Comic Attack)
Kory Cerjak on vol. 2 of Komomo Confiserie (The Fandom Post)
Kory Cerjak on vol. 12 of Magi (The Fandom Post)
Johanna Draper Carlson on vol. 2 of Master Keaton (Comics Worth Reading)
Ash Brown on vol. 7 of Mushishi (Experiments in Manga)
Lesley Aeschliman on vol. 7 of My Love Story!! (WatchPlayRead)
Sean Gaffney on vol. 1 of My Monster Secret (A Case Suitable for Treatment)
Christian Chiok on Naruto: The Seventh Hokage and the Scarlet Spring (Japanator)
Kristin on vols. 3 and 4 of One Punch Man (Comic Attack)
Matthew Warner on vol. 2 of Peepo Choo (The Fandom Post)
Sean Gaffney on vols. 23 and 24 of Ranma 1/2 (A Case Suitable for Treatment)
Anna N. on vol. 3 of Requiem of the Rose King (Manga Report)
Johanna Draper Carlson on vol. 9 of Say I Love You (Comics Worth Reading)
Johanna Draper Carlson on vol. 1 of Shuriken and Pleats (Comics Worth Reading)
Ken H on vol. 3 of A Silent Voice (Sequential Ink)
L.B. Bryant on vol. 1 of Steins;Gate (ICv2)
Sean Gaffney on vol. 2 of Strike the Blood (A Case Suitable for Treatment)
Marion Olea on vol. 2 of Tokyo Ghoul (No Flying, No Tights)
Lesley Aeschliman on vol. 3 of Twin Star Exorcists (WatchPlayRead)